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Routine Vet Visits

We are happy to schedule and handle your horses for vet care. We use Village Veterinary Clinic for our routine vet services. Please make sure you have opened an account with them with a credit card on file. You can reach them at 512-263-2229 or http://villagevet.biz.

Also, please make sure your account is paid in full as they will not allow us to charge to your account unless it is in good standing.

Fill out the form below as soon as you can so I can submit the information to Dr. Garza's office. Thanks!
Annual Shots due Tues, February 19, 2008
Your Name


Your horse's name


Your presence is not required for the vet visit. Do you plan to come to meet with the vet on Feb 19, 2008 at 10am?


Yes, I want my horse to get VEWT/West Nile vaccine $38

Yes, I want my horse to get a Rabies vaccine $15

Yes, I want my horse to get a Rhino/Flu vaccine $22

Yes, I want my horse to get a Strangles vaccine $28

Yes, I want my horse to have a Coggins Test $25

Yes, I want my horse to have his/her teeth checked

Yes, I approve the vet to float my horses teeth if needed (and clean his sheath if needed while under anesthesia) +-$132

Yes, I understand there will be a farm call charge of $5 per horse--a reduced rate since there are more than 10 for this farm call.

Yes, I do want to have Christi administer Strongid 2x daily wormer and start my horse on Prevent-a-care insurance

Yes, my horse is on Prevent-a-care and I approve my horse to get the required Pfizer wormer semi-annual administration by the vet $22

Yes, I need a tube of Bute to put in the refridgerator because I am out $18

Yes, I need a tube of Banamine for the refridgerator because I am out $40

Please ask the vet to check the following issues on my horse. I understand there may be additional fees involved.


Here are notes or questions for Christi pertaining to the vet visit.


Please leave this field blank
Spring Vet Visit -- annual shots At the recommendation of Dr. Garza, each spring we have him administer the following inoculations:

VEWT combined with the $38 WNV (West Nile Virus)
(Encephalomyelitis Vaccine Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus, Tetanus Toxoid. Cephalovac® VEWT contains gentamicin and thimerosal as preservatives.)
Encephalomyelitis: (Vew in Vew-t) More commonly known as sleeping sickness. Most
often transmitted by mosquitoes (after the insects have acquired the virus from birds and
rodents), horse-to-horse or horse to person transmission is rare. Signs vary widely, but
result from infection of the brain and / or spinal cord. Early signs include depression,
appetite loss and fever. Paralysis develops in later stages and may cause the horse to
stagger.
West Nile: West Nile virus can cause encephalomyelitis. Also transmitted by
mosquitoes, West Nile has been diagnosed in horses from coast to coast in the United
States. The mortality rate for West Nile is 25 – 35%.
Click here for more information on VEWT
Click here for more information on the West Nile Virus Prevention

RF (Rhino/Flu)
Intramuscular Influenza and Rhinopneumonitis vaccine
Influenza: (Flu) One of the most common respiratory viral diseases. Influenza is highly
contagious – able to be transmitted by snorting or coughing from horse to horse over
distances as far as 30 yards. Symptoms include cough, nasal discharge, fever, depression
and loss of appetite. Influenza vaccine can be administered either through intramuscular
injection or intranasally.

Rhinopneumonitis: (Rhino) Equine herpesvirus (type 1 and 4) causes two different
diseases. Both cause respiratory problems. Type 1 can cause abortion, foal death, and
paralysis. Infected horses might be feverish and lethargic, may lose appetite and
experience nasal discharge and cough. Young horses suffer most from respiratory tract
infections. Rhino is spread by coughing and snorting or by direct contact with secretions,
utensils or drinking water. Virus may be present but not apparent in carrier animals.
Click here for more information about the RF vaccine, Calvenza

Rabies
Click here for more information about equine rabies

Strangles
Streptococcus equi: (Strep, Strangles) A highly contagious and dangerous bacterial
disease caused by streptococcus equi organism. Strep vaccines are available through
intramuscular injections or intranasally.
Click here for more information on Strangles and prevention

Teeth Check
Float Teeth: Horses teeth erupt throughout their lives, consequently developing sharp
enamel points. They should have checkups twice a year. If the horse is having trouble
eating, not eating, dropping grain, won’t bit up or is tossing his head, these may be signs
of dental problems.
Click here for more information on equine dental health care

Coggins Test
Coggins test: (Equine Infectious Anemia) – Equine infectious anemia (EIA), also known
as swamp fever, is a viral disease for which there is no know cure or vaccination. Horses
affected with acute EIA will show symptoms of fever, depression and loss of appetite.
To perform a coggins test, a licensed veterinarian must draw a sample of blood to send to
an approved testing facility to be tested for EIA antibodies

Banamine
I give my horses a dose of Banamine to prevent swelling, absess reaction to shots. I can use the Banamine you have in the refridgerator if you would like to try to use it up before it expires. It has a long life. Please indicate on the form if you would like Banamine given either by me or injected IV by the vet.
Autumn Vet Visit -- Boosters The vet comes around August or September each year to administer booster shots, check  and float teeth if needed.

RF (Rhino/Flu)
Intramuscular Influenza and Rhinopneumonitis vaccine
Influenza: (Flu) One of the most common respiratory viral diseases. Influenza is highly
contagious – able to be transmitted by snorting or coughing from horse to horse over
distances as far as 30 yards. Symptoms include cough, nasal discharge, fever, depression
and loss of appetite. Influenza vaccine can be administered either through intramuscular
injection or intranasally.

Rhinopneumonitis: (Rhino) Equine herpesvirus (type 1 and 4) causes two different
diseases. Both cause respiratory problems. Type 1 can cause abortion, foal death, and
paralysis. Infected horses might be feverish and lethargic, may lose appetite and
experience nasal discharge and cough. Young horses suffer most from respiratory tract
infections. Rhino is spread by coughing and snorting or by direct contact with secretions,
utensils or drinking water. Virus may be present but not apparent in carrier animals.
Click here for more information about the RF vaccine, Calvenza

West Nile
West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne disease that causes inflammation or swelling of the brain and spinal cord. Since its discovery in New York in 1999, the virus has spread rapidly across the country, infecting horses, birds or humans in nearly every state in the continental U.S. One in three clinically-infected horses will die.*
These symptoms can be confused with rabies, EPM ("Possum Disease), equine encephalitis, and other serious neurological diseases. If you see these signs in your horse, see your veterinarian immediately.
    * Stumbling or tripping
    * Muscle weakness or twitching
    * Partial paralysis
    * Loss of appetite
    * Depression or lethargy
    * Head pressing or tilt
    * Impaired vision
    * Wandering or circling
    * Inability to swallow
    * Inability to stand up
    * Fever
    * Convulsions
    * Coma
    * Death

EPM
Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a disease that affects the horse's spinal cord and brain. It is caused by a protozoa that until recently was called Sarcocystis neurona. Researchers have discovered that this organism is virtually identical to a protozoa called Sarcocystis falcatula, which is a parasite that infests several bird species, including cowbirds and grackles. Opossums are the normal host animals, although the parasite must pass through a bird before completing its lifecycle in the opossum.


Click here for information about recognizing EPM in horses
Broodmares Broodmares:

    4 weeks pre-breeding and/or 4 weeks pre-foaling:

        Tetanus Encephalitis
        Flu/Rhino
        West Nile

        5, 7 and 9 months of pregnancy:  Rhinopneumonitis ("Rhino")


Foals:

    6 months: Tetanus Encephalitis

    7 months: Tetanus Encephalitis

    9 months: Tetanus Encephalitis, Flu/Rhino, West Nile

    10 months: Flu/Rhino, West Nile
Foals FOALS

MINIMUM RECOMMENDATIONS

4 months of age - EHV 1 4 and West Nile
5 ½ months of age - PHF EWT EHV 1 4 West Nile and Pinnacle
Booster 3 weeks later - PHF EWT West Nile and Pinnacle
8 months of age - PHF EWT Flu Avert and EHV 1 4

AAEP FOAL VACCINATION RECOMMENDATIONS

The American Association of Equine Practitioners recommends this vaccination protocol. Your individual situation may be different.

4 Months - EHV 1 4 and West Nile
5 Months - EHV 1 4 and West Nile
6 Months - PHF EWT Rabies West Nile and Pinnacle**
6 Months - Pinnacle booster
7 Months - PHF EWT Flu Avert adn EHV 1 4
8 Months - Rabies
9 Months - PHF and EWT
10 Months - EHV 1 4
11 Months - Flu Avert
1 Year - EHV 1 4 and Pinnacle
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